open-air

A post from an upset festival goer on a Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/342923909383325/

It’s fall which means it’s festival season. With ACL and other big festivals coming up in Texas teams of social media coordinators are banding together to keep the festival goers happily interacting with artists and staff. This weekend the city of Houston, Texas was all set up to have a twenty-plus weekend long alternative rock music festival. As all Texan residents know the weather can change in the blink of an eye. On Sunday, the second day of the festival artist performances were getting constantly pushed back due to threat of lightning. The festival was eventually cancelled at around 3:00 pm today. Open Air addressed their audience periodically through their Facebook page. When the festival cancelled the social media backlash was immediate and severe.

Here are one of the official posts from Houston Air about the official cancellation of the festival. On Saturday the day before there was a constant disgruntled with the listeners due to the fact that the weather constantly interrupted the flow of the show with delays. This was also seen at a fellow show this weekend in Dallas, called Texas Mutiny. What is most important and in correlation with the success of up and coming festivals is the satisfaction and reputation of your festival.

Reactions to the posts were not good ones. Fans were not appreciative of the slow response times to their concerns and questions. A group on Facebook even formed called “People Against Houston Open Air” to reflect their disappointment towards the festival’s social media efforts.

Overall, I definitely saw how social media for a festival should not be operated. It is important to be proactive and helpful when dealing with crises via social media. Once something negative happens, the best thing to do is create a plan of action and figure out solutions to keep a positive image.

It’s fall which means it’s festival season. With ACL and other big festivals coming up in Texas teams of social media coordinators are banding together to keep the festival goers happily interacting with artists and staff. This weekend the city of Houston, Texas was all set up to have a twenty-plus weekend long alternative rock music festival. As all Texan residents know the weather can change in the blink of an eye. On Sunday, the second day of the festival artist performances were getting constantly pushed back due to threat of lightning. The festival was eventually cancelled at around 3:00 pm today. Open Air addressed their audience periodically through their Facebook page . When the festival cancelled the social media backlash was immediate and severe.

Here is one of the official posts from Houston Air about the official cancellation of the festival. On Saturday the day before there was a constant disgruntled with the listeners due to the fact that the weather constantly interrupted the flow of the show with delays. This was also seen at a fellow show this weekend in Dallas, called Texas Mutiny. What is most important and in correlation with the success of up and coming festivals is the satisfaction and reputation of your festival.

Reactions to the posts were not good ones. Fans were not appreciative of the slow response times to their concerns and questions. A group on Facebook even formed called “People Against Houston Open Air” to reflect their disappointment towards the festival’s social media efforts.

Overall, I definitely saw how social media for a festival should not be operated. It is important to be proactive and helpful when dealing with crises via social media. Once something negative happens, the best thing to do is create a plan of action and figure out solutions to keep a positive image.

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